Gourmet comida corrida

February 20th, 2012

A while back I posted about the joys of the local fonda that serves a forty-peso comida corrida around the corner from my apartment. While I eat there fairly frequently, the truth about most fondas is that their comidas corridas tend to be heavy on carbohydrates and, depending on what you order for your main course, often on the greasy side.

On Calle Parras between Avenida Nuevo León and Avenida Amsterdam in the Colonia Condesa, however, there are two sidewalk fondas that serve what I have come to think of as gourmet comida corrida. They are not as cheap as ordinary fondas but, at eighty-five or ninety pesos, they are nevertheless a bargain, especially considering the quality of their ingredients.

At both the Gastrofonda Quim Jardi — named after its chef, who is either a Mexican Catalan or a Catalan Mexican, depending on your point of view — and the fonda Kousmine next door, run by a Frenchman who posts certificates with his culinary credentials on the outside tarp, you can get meals that are easier on the belly and the blood sugar than at ordinary fondas.

Menu at Quim Jardí

The first course are soups that tend to be made with fresh herbs and vegetables, and the second course — instead of the rice or soggy spaghetti served at ordinary fondas — is salad made with fresh dressings. For the main courses, at each place, you have your choice of chicken, beef, fish or something vegetarian, again, all prepared with fresh ingredients and sometimes extraordinary sauces. Quim, for instance, has a fish in a delectably spice mole, while the Frenchman makes a lovely arrachera with soy sauce and crunchy vegetables. Desserts are homemade and served with bracing espresso.

Menu at Kousmine. Lady, would you please get your head out of the way?

Labels: Mexico City

  1. 9 Responses to “Gourmet comida corrida”

  2. By jcs on Feb 20, 2012

    Mexico City is full of good restaurants which are affordable (by international standards). Eating the tasty and affordable food is one of the best reasons to come to Mexico City.

  3. By James on Feb 21, 2012

    Great blog posting. Exactly the kind of thing that is great to know, but nearly impossible to discover on one’s own unless you get lucky. The photos and chalkboard menu remind me of inexpensive restaurants in France, especially the south, where you can get a great lunch for a good price.

  4. By jim johnston on Feb 21, 2012

    One of my favorite ‘gourmet comida corrida’ places in Colonia Roma is on Calle Orizaba–they have a website where you can check the daily specials:

    http://chicha171.wordpress.com/

  5. By Eric Duran on Feb 21, 2012

    I love comida corrida prices and authenticity at certain places in Mexico. In Coyoacán I recently ate at Centenario 107 and El Meson de los Leones, both a mere $90 pesitos. Years ago I´d frequent La Sopa at Callejón del Diamante in Xalapa, Ver. With relaxed environments it´s easier to digest the food too!

  6. By Juliet Lambert on Feb 24, 2012

    Yes, I love Quim Jardi’s place! It used to be called Rauxa, right?

    I love the fact that I can get a great vegetarian option comida corrida there. One of the only places in town you can.

  7. By HRH The Duchess of State on Feb 26, 2012

    What a FAB post dahhling… can’t wait to try some of this during your next visit.

  8. By Barry Carr on Feb 28, 2012

    Thanks David for yet another really helpful posting. I’ll be checking out those comidas corridas on my next visit to the eh DF in a couple months. As one of the old-timers who read your blog I just have to recall that when I was a grad student in Mexico City in the late 1960s (and I lived on Ave Amsterdam; 221: Dep 3 – still remember the address) I almost always won the informal competition among us impoverished students- to find the cheapest comida corrida in town. I recall that my lowest find (in more than one sense!!) was a comida for 3 pesos. It wasn’t in Hipodromo-Condesa of course- but it was quite tasty all the same.

  9. By Strika on Feb 29, 2012

    Hi David,

    I think the owner of Kousmine is Mexican, not French. But he did study in France according to his culinary credentials…

  10. By Coco on Jan 8, 2013

    There is an exellent place in Queretaro named Secuoya, Pino suarez 326, Gastrofonda, with wonderful dishes full of flavor and fresh vegetables, at 60 pesos highly recomended!

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